Natural sea shells in fused glass

I just got back from Australia, where glass is very popular.  I spoke to one artist who used clear glass to make platters but somehow got impressions into the glass using sea shells.  He said sometimes he puts them underneath, and sometimes between layers of glass.  Has anyone tried this?  Any ideas how to go about doing it?  Do the shells just disintegrate?  thanks,  vicki

 

 

 

 

I'd make a plaster/silica

I'd make a plaster/silica replica of the shell and fuse over that.  If the design has no undercuts you could do it out of clay, bisque fire it, kiln wash it, and re-use it.

Real shells disintegrate and can create huge bubbles due to off-gassing.

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Paul
FusedGlass.Org
Helios Kiln Glass Studio
PaulTarlow.com

 

at what temp do the shells disintergrate?

I would like to incorporated sea glass with slumped glass - the temp runs about 1500 degrees for about 5 mins...

Pam B I also made molds of

Pam B

I also made molds of the shells to slump glass over. I also made molds of small shells and coated them with mica powder to fuse between two layers of glass leaving the mold in place. I have experimented with shells and the probliem is that you can never tell which shells will just turn to ash and muck up your piece.  Sea glass is at a higher coe than 90 or 96 so it can not be mixed with coe compatable glass.  My guess would be that the wonderful texture of the sea glass would be lost in firing anyway. You could create the look of sea glass with sandblasting or etching paste after firing though.

Experimenting creates so many failures but even though my bucket is over flowing with mistakes, it is so much fun to see what works..... trial and error is the way to learn and to create your unique teckniques..

Pam

 

Pam B I also made molds of

Pam B

I also made molds of the shells to slump glass over. I also made molds of small shells and coated them with mica powder to fuse between two layers of glass leaving the mold in place. I have experimented with shells and the probliem is that you can never tell which shells will just turn to ash and muck up your piece.  Sea glass is at a higher coe than 90 or 96 so it can not be mixed with coe compatable glass.  My guess would be that the wonderful texture of the sea glass would be lost in firing anyway. You could create the look of sea glass with sandblasting or etching paste after firing though.

Experimenting creates so many failures but even though my bucket is over flowing with mistakes, it is so much fun to see what works..... trial and error is the way to learn and to create your unique teckniques..

Pam

 

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